Apple Juice from High Hill Ranch Tests Positive for E. Coli Bacteria



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Health department officials have confirmed that E. coli bacteria sickened seven people who consumed unpasteurized apple juice

One person was hospitalized, but is expected to recover.

A sample of apple juice from High Hill Ranch in Apple Hill, Camino, California, has tested positive for E. coli bacteria, local health department officials have confirmed.

Results for two other samples are still pending. coli outbreak stemming from High Hill Ranch, a member of the Apple Hill Growers Association. coli poisoning after consuming unpasteurized apple juice from the ranch.

All of the juice was consumed either at home or at High Hill Ranch. One person was hospitalized as a result of the food poisoning, but is expected to recover.

In the last few weeks, incidences of E. coli have seemed to wreak havoc on public health, with officials pointing to the bacteria as a potential culprit for an illness which struck at least 60 people who consumed apple cider during a fall harvest festival in Illinois. An E. coli outbreak also forced Chipotle to close 43 locations in Oregon and Washington state.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


Food Safety Facts

Commercially prepared mayonnaise, salad dressings and sauces are very safe and have a remarkable food safety record. However, despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness.

Despite a large body of evidence to the contrary, there persists a belief among many American consumers that mayonnaise, in particular, is a major cause of foodborne illness. For more than 75 years, members of the scientific and regulatory communities have conducted research and published articles that document the safety of commercially prepared mayonnaise and salad dressing. Time and time again, the popular condiment has been exonerated by leading authorities on food safety. Yet, the American public refuses to give up the myth about mayonnaise and foodborne illness.

Indeed, commercial mayonnaise and spoonable (mayonnaise-like) salad dressings are carefully formulated with highly acidic ingredients and pasteurized eggs and manufactured under rigorous quality control procedures making these products extremely unlikely sources for bacteria that cause foodborne illness. These commercial products contain pasteurized eggs that are free of Salmonella and other dangerous bacteria. Acidulents, such as vinegar and lemon juice, create a high-acid environment that slows, or prevents, bacterial growth. Salt is also an important ingredient in commercial mayonnaise that contributes to the unfavorable environment for microbial growth.

Where did the “mayo myth” begin?

Homemade mayonnaise recipes gave birth to the myth that mayonnaise causes foodborne illness. Homemade mayonnaise recipes almost always call for raw eggs. But, scientists now know that uncooked shell eggs can sometimes be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria. Also, homemade mayonnaise, unlike commercial products, may not contain enough salt and vinegar to counteract the growth of harmful bacteria, as the vinegar and salt levels often vary greatly in recipes for homemade mayonnaise.

Now, it is unsafe food handling and preparation in home kitchens and foodservice operations that pose a greater threat of bacterial contamination of food.

Many low-acid foods, like chicken, ham or potatoes, are susceptible to the growth of bacteria and are often mixed with mayonnaise. Mishandled, these foods can create a favorable medium for food contamination. There are many potential sources of bacterial contamination in the on-site preparation of “homemade” recipes, including the various ingredients of these recipes and other foods and surfaces in the kitchen that could serve to cross-contaminate. It is for this reason that the use of commercially prepared mayonnaise and dressing is encouraged for restaurant and home use. Despite the microbiological safety of commercial mayonnaise, mixing mayonnaise with contaminated ingredients will not assure the safety of these combined mixtures.


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